Special Pathogens Research Network [Spparenet] Ltd

Abstract

Non-target oral bacterial resistance to Cotrimoxazole in HIV/AIDS patients living in South Western Uganda

 1Ihongbe JC, 2Moazzam ML, 3Pazos V and 3Agwu E.

 1Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Babcock University, Illisan Remo, Ogun State, Nigeria. 2Department of Public Health, School of Allied Health Sciences, Kampala International University and 3Disease Intervention and Management Failure (DIMAF) research group, Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, Kampala International University, Box 71, Bushenyi, Uganda

 

Special Bacterial Pathogens Journal (SBPJ) 2015; Vol 1, No 1: p 0001-0004. Copyright © Special Pathogens Research Network Limited, Uganda, All Rights Reserved (www.spparenet.us)                                                                                                                                    

How to cite this article:

Ihongbe JC, Moazzam ML, Pazos V and Agwu E. Non-target oral bacterial resistance to co-trimoxazole in HIV/AIDS patients living in South Western Uganda. SBPJ 2015;1(1):0001-0004

 

Original article-Human

Non-target oral bacterial resistance to Cotrimoxazole in HIV/AIDS patients living in South Western Uganda

Abstract

Objective: This study was designed to assess the long-term effect of prolonged routine cotrimoxazole prophylaxis on non-target bacteria isolated from oral lesions of HIV/AIDS patients in South Western Uganda. Method: Exactly 605 swabs (469 from females and 136 from males), were randomly collected from oral lesions of The AIDS Support Organization (TASO) HIV/AIDS patients in 4 Districts of Uganda. Sample processing was done aseptically using standard Microbiological techniques. Randomized Block Design (α = 0.05) was used to compare both the prevalence and resistance of bacterial isolates. Results: In Mbarara/Bushenyi districts, bacteria prevalence was 50.4%, followed by 20.8% in Rukungiri and 20.3% in Masaka districts. Most bacteria from Rukungiri showed 100% resistance. In Mbarara/Bushenyi, S. aureus, B. catarrhalis and Non-hemolytic Streptococcus showed 100% resistance while B. cerius, S. aureus, E. coli and B. subtilis showed 100% resistance in Masaka. Bacteria prevalence was significantly (p<0.05) dependent on location and district of isolation. Different bacteria isolates significantly (p<0.05) differed in their response to different antibiotics tested. Conclusion: Despite its overall benefit, prolonged cotrimoxazole prophylaxis may have a long term disadvantage such as the evolution of 100% resistance by non-target oral bacterial isolates recovered from HIV/AIDS patients living in Uganda.

Key words: Cotrimoxazole resistance, Non-target oral bacteria, HIV/AIDS patients

 

Corresponding Author: Ihongbe JC, PhD. Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Babcock University, Illisan Remo, Ogun State, Nigeria. ihongbej@yahoo.com ; Phone: +2348072319857.